Research //

Integrative Technologies

The Maurice Wilkins Centre supports the development of new technologies, and applications of technologies, for medical research. This ensures scientists have the high-tech capability to deliver on their ideas, accelerating the discovery of new drugs, vaccines and diagnostic techniques.

Its technology programme feeds directly into its human disease research programmes – focused on cancer, diabetes and metabolic disease, and infectious disease – or has the capability to be used in this way in future.

In supporting inter-disciplinary research, the Centre also stimulates adaptation of technology from one scientific field to another, a process that often generates exciting new capabilities.

The Centre has particular strengths in computer-based technologies to integrate complex information about biological systems. Its other work ranges from developing new methods in synthetic chemistry to new forms of three-dimensional imaging.

THE MAURICE WILKINS CENTRE UNDERTAKES RESEARCH IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS

New modalities for challenging drug discovery

Advances in molecular biology have heralded an expansion of protein-based therapeutics, and sophisticated peptide chemistry has also opened up new therapeutic options.

Transition state analysis as a smart approach to the development of novel tailored therapeutics

Maurice Wilkins Centre scientists are using an approach called transition state analysis to generate potent and selective enzyme inhibitors, several of which have already been tested in preclinical and human trials for their potential as treatments for a variety of infectious diseases, haematological disorders and gout.

Early-stage target selection & drug screening

This content is currently being updated. Please contact
maurice-wilkins-centre@auckland.ac.nz with any queries.

Advanced cell & tissue culture technology

This content is currently being updated. Please contact
maurice-wilkins-centre@auckland.ac.nz with any queries.

RECENT HIGHLIGHTS FROM OUR INTEGRATIVE TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH PROGRAMME