Research //

Infectious Disease

Infectious disease continues to be a major threat to health throughout the world, and New Zealand is far from immune. Current threats include diseases such as tuberculosis (TB), which remains difficult to treat or prevent, and newly emerging diseases, such as those caused by new virus strains and highly drug-resistant bacteria.

New Zealand also suffers from very high rates of infectious diseases long considered conquered elsewhere in the developed world, especially diseases resulting from streptococcus infection, such as acute rheumatic fever. Many of these infections disproportionally affect our most economically vulnerable citizens.

Our research programme has a strong focus on bacterial infection, including TB, staphylococcus and streptococcus. Individual projects cover the spectrum from basic research, such as asking why a bacterium is able to defeat the human immune system, to investigating potential anti-microbial drugs. A growing viral research programme helps underpin the nation’s capability in responding to the threats posed by viruses.

THE MAURICE WILKINS CENTRE UNDERTAKES RESEARCH IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS

Group A streptococcus

This content is currently being updated. Please contact
maurice-wilkins-centre@auckland.ac.nz with any queries.

Tuberculosis

From learning about new target molecules within the tuberculosis organism, to developing new vaccines and drugs.

New molecular targets in bacterial disease

This content is currently being updated. Please contact
maurice-wilkins-centre@auckland.ac.nz with any queries.

Viral proteins as vaccine components & drug targets

This content is currently being updated. Please contact 
maurice-wilkins-centre@auckland.ac.nz with any queries.

RECENT HIGHLIGHTS FROM OUR INFECTIOUS DISEASES RESEARCH PROGRAMME